Message from Stuart Klein, Executive Director

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Something we invite all of our patients and their caregivers to do is reach out for support. Aside from the medical care patients receive at our facility, we offer many ways for them to meet other patients and their caregivers in organized meetings and informal get-togethers. Often it is the spontaneous connections that patients make with one another in the lobby, at the Wednesday luncheon, or at their temporary housing complex, for example, that can have an enormous positive influence. Whatever your personal style may be, we hope that you will not hesitate to ask for support throughout your medical journey.

Sincerely,

Stuart L. Klein

Executive Director

Patient Spotlight: Wayne Humphreys

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Wendy made a “graduation day” card for Wayne when he completed his last treatment.

By Theresa Edwards Makrush

A big-hearted pony named Bouncer and his equally big-hearted owner Wayne Humphreys had lots of love to give — in the form of carriage rides — to pediatric patients and their parents. In return, the children gave extra treats and affection to Bouncer and a positive boost to fellow patient Wayne. “When you’re in a strange place for eight, nine, 10 weeks, to reach out to people is so important,” said Wayne. “It was equally good for me as them.”

Wayne, a retired U.S. Navy Captain who lives in Virginia and in the past had wintered in Florida, was at the UF Health Proton Therapy Institute for prostate cancer treatment last fall. His network of Naval Academy alumni, 1964 Cares, pointed him in the direction of proton therapy. A good friend in the group, a retired orthopedic surgeon, told him he needed to look into proton therapy and sent him a list of all the proton therapy facilities in the U.S. 

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One of many carriage rides Bouncer and Wayne gave Wendy

Wayne was encouraged when he saw UF on the list. His late wife Sybil Humphreys and a good friend from Kentucky both had received excellent care at UF Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville. He contacted the Proton Therapy Institute and within a day or two had a packet of information. He said the first contact with the intake department re-emphasized his resolve to have proton therapy at the facility.

 

“It’s not enough to have world-class facilities, you have to have world-class patient services,” said Wayne. “I had high expectations and my expectations were exceeded.”

Wayne stayed at 3rd and Main apartments while in Jacksonville for proton therapy. He brought his pony and three dogs. The pony stayed at Skyway Farm about 15 minutes from the Institute. “I was going out about four or five times a week to drive Bouncer. Most of my appointments were in the early morning so you had all the rest of the day to do things.” All during treatment he felt well enough to carry on his normal activities. He participated in the lunches and dinners arranged by patient services director Bradlee Robbert and other activities with fellow patients. “You see the kids and how going through cancer breaks their hearts. One day I thought, ‘Gee, I could give them rides in the carriage,’” said Wayne.

The first child who rode on the carriage was Wendy Anthony, a 12-year-old girl from Canada having proton therapy for a brain tumor. She and her father, Dave, had become good friends with Wayne as neighbors at 3rd and Main and as fellow patients. She encouraged the other children at the Institute to give it a try, and gradually over the next four weeks up to six children would drive out to Skyway Farm twice a week to visit with Bouncer and go for a ride in the carriage. 

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Bouncer, Wendy and her father Dave

“One day there were six or seven children there. I gave them a few lessons explaining the do's and dont's of handling horses,” said Wayne. “Then I told them about Bouncer’s accomplishments. Bouncer is the first U.S. horse or pony to win a Gold medal in international combined driving competition when he won in England in 2005. He was the smallest pony in the competition. Bouncer won because he had the biggest heart and he set his mind to it. We can treat our cancer and win the same way, if we set our minds to it,” he said.

Read more about Bouncer’s and Wayne’s campaign to raise awareness and Federal funding for pancreatic cancer research in honor of Wayne’s late wife Sybil who passed away due to pancreatic cancer in 2011.

Meet Stephanie Saman, Adult Oncology Social Worker


Saman_Stephanie-9727.jpgWe are pleased to welcome to our staff adult oncology social worker Stephanie Saman. Her role is to work with adult patients and families and encourage them to become involved in our community of mutual concern and support. She develops and facilitates support groups for all adult patients as well as provides individual counseling where she emphasizes the importance of human relationships. 

As part of the care team, she consults and collaborates with physicians, nurses and others to ensure the psychosocial needs of patients are met.

Ms. Saman empowers patients and their families to function optimally throughout the treatment process by assisting them in accessing the health care system and community resources available. She engages the community to cultivate enhanced support and resources for adult patients. 

Ms. Saman has a Masters in Social Work from Florida State University and is a member of the National Association of Social Workers and the Association of Oncology Social Work.

- compiled by Theresa Edwards Makrush

Finishing breast cancer is the goal

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Juana Gifford and Stuart Klein were two of many booth volunteers.

By Theresa Edwards Makrush

Jacksonville native, journalist and philanthropist Donna Deegan founded the first U.S. marathon dedicated to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer treatment and research. Held each February in Jacksonville Beach since 2008, the 26.2 with Donna: The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer has become a staple of the annual events calendar for runners and spectators alike. 

UF Health Proton Therapy Institute participated in the Donna Expo at the Prime Osborn Convention Center in downtown Jacksonville on February 12 and 13. Volunteers from the Institute’s staff distributed information about proton therapy for breast cancer treatment. It was a great opportunity to spread the word about proton therapy and to support the cause to finish breast cancer.

About This Newsletter

The Precision Newsletter is an electronic-only publication that is distributed by email. Each issue is sent monthly to patients, alumni patients and friends of the University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute. As the official newsletter of the Institute, the content is compiled and prepared by our communications representative and approved by the editor Stuart Klein, executive director of UF Health Proton Therapy Institute. Special bulletin newsletters may occasionally be prepared when timely topics and new developments in proton therapy occur.  We will make every effort to remove your name from the list. If you would like to send a Letter to the Editor, please click here.

 

Keep In Touch

It is easy to stay in touch with us online at floridaproton.org . Look at the top right corner of the homepage for Facebook , Twitter and YouTube icons, click and join us in the social media conversation. Also on the right side of the homepage there is a button for VTOC Patient Portal . Click here to open your secure account, view your records, complete clinical trial questionnaires and communicate with your nurse case manager.

 

Knowing how you are feeling during and after treatment is essential to providing you the best care possible and contributes to the care of future patients.